So You Want a Ham Radio for Emergency Communications!

Published on Dec 9, 2012 by CommsPrepper
Amateur Radio Band Chart:

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Regula…

Amateur Electronic Supply (AES): http://www.aesham.com

Ham Radio Outlet (HRO): http://www.hamradio.com

got comms? Amateur radio – more than 100 years of prepping tradition.
NO POLITICS OR WEAPONS — Just Communications and Technology for Emergency Communications.
Please do not post comments or ask questions on how to do things illegally. I will remove the comments and block you. This channel is about learning new skills and sharing knowledge. This a not a channel for illegal modifications or operations. Thank you.
https://plus.google.com/115754160810813990011
6,476 subscribers
400,663 views
Joined Aug 14, 2012

About The Author

Related posts

25 Comments

  1. richz650

    I literally bought some random HAM radio off of Amazon. I have no idea how
    to operate it….yet

  2. Robert Mitchum

    The best way to learn about Ham Radio is to talk with a Ham Radio Operator.
    99.9% of all Hams will be more than willing to help you out. Most of them
    will even be more than happy to show you there shack and try the equipment
    out. This video is helpful, but there is so much information left out, and
    at no fault of the guy presenting it. A 10 hour video could not explain all
    there is to Ham Radio. There are 26 or 27 different types of Ham Radio out
    there, no nobody could cover them all. My advice. ….. Talk to a Ham.

  3. Maurice Gundrum

    Thank you for the info. Would a portable/hand held radio be capable for
    regional use? New to the subject and do not want to get stuck with
    something I can not use. East Coast to West Coast is as far as my needs
    would require at this time. Peace

  4. Judith Griffith

    Hello
    Southern Prepper 1 (Dave) said that you could probably help me to program
    my Baofeng 777S walkie talkie radio. Any information would be appreciated.
    Thank you ~ Judy

  5. FlintF

    What about the statement: “In case of EMP, none of these radio’s will work”?
    /honest question

  6. billyboi57

    Anything from 6 meters and down is not line of sight. I have also worked DX
    on 2 meters. Something else many people do not know, in a bonafide
    emergency ANYONE can legally operate an amateur radio station. Note; IN AN
    EMERGENCY ONLY.

  7. codyf115

    What are the advantages and disadvantages of different antenna types.
    Ground plane, vertical or horizontal dipole, omnidirectional stick. Also
    what is a J-Pole.

  8. Samuel Self

    By operating privileges you mean transmit and receive. Anyone can can buy
    any radio and listen on whatever frequency their radio can get. You can not
    transmit without a license. Anyone can also transmit on any frequency in a
    life and death situation.

  9. Bruce Nitroxpro

    Excellent overview… you might want people to know that HF radios require
    rather “interesting” antennas to work well. Translate that to “LARGE” or
    “LONG…” Not necessarily expensive, but definitely a CHALLENGE to all new
    to the hobby.

  10. David DeRoche

    Great info. Thanks. What if I just want to get a international
    communication radio and start talking to people? How can they catch me
    without a license? What is the penalty?

  11. Christopher French

    Technician Class are permitted to operate on 6 meter (50-54 mhz), 2 meter
    (144 – 148), 1.25 meter (222 – 225 mhz), 70 cm (420 -450 mhz), 33 cm
    (902-928 mhz), 23 cm (1240 – 1300), and 13 cm band (2300 – 2310 mhz, 2390 –
    2450 mhz). Technicians are also permitted to communicate a some HF bands as
    well. 80 meter ( 3.525 – 3.600 mhz), 40 meters (7.025 – 7.125 mhz), 15
    meter ( 21.025 – 21.200), and 10 meter ( 28.000 – 28.500 ). Chris French
    KD2CLQ

  12. richz650

    +Comms Prepper BaoFeng UV-5R+ Dual-Band 136-174/400-480 MHz FM Ham Two-Way
    Radio.

    I have no clue what it does?

  13. itsjimmyo

    This is not completely true Technician Class licensees also have privileges
    in four amateur service bands in the HF range (3-30 MHz) (Refer to Section
    97.301(e)).

  14. wichitarob38

    I’m really thinking about investing in the Yaesu 817nd…..some people say
    it’s to low of power, and yes I understand it is QRP….would just like a
    little feed back from what people think…..I eventually plan on upgrading
    to the general, so I want all freqs.

Comments are closed.